MEASURING & FITTING

Welcome to our Measuring and Fitting Centre.
This area contains information and videos on about how to measure and fit your carpet, what equipment you need and how to care for your new floor. If you have any other questions relating to the measuring and fitting of flooring, our knowledgeable and friendly team will be happy to help on 03333 202 404

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Measuring Guide

This step-by-step advice guide is suitable for first time measurers, novices or even people with previous experience in making sure the carpet size you order is perfect for your room or stairs. There are also video guides for a visual look at how to measure up your floor exactly!

fitter
Fitting Guide

To keep our prices as low as possible, we can help you find a local approved fitter!

Measuring Guide

Buying new flooring for your house is always an exciting prospect, but it can also become a big expense if not approached correctly. To relieve some of the stresses and problems of sorting out new flooring for your house, we have created a handy walkthrough guide that will help you accurately estimate the amount of flooring you will need to buy for your rooms! The simple guides below (one for standard rooms, one for stairs) will allow you to skip the possible expense of hiring a retailer or carpet fitter to come out and measure up your room - saving time and money!

If you have any queries or questions, simply contact us and our well trained sales team will offer extra advice!

Measure up, work out what sizes you need and order online. Our guide below will help.
View Our Guide
Measure your rooms and get in touch with us by phone or email and we’ll work out what sizes you need. If it helps draw a diagram, take a photo or scan it in and email it to us.
Send Us your Details
If you’re stuck and need someone to come out and measure give us a call and we can give you contact details of fitters in your area that will come out and measure your rooms.
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OUR BASIC MEASURING GUIDE

Measuring Rooms

This guide will help you measure up and work out what sizes of carpet or vinyl you need to order.
Firstly there are points to understand that will help make it easier:
1. In general you just need to measure the widest and longest point of the room. The carpet you are getting will be all one piece so it needs to cover all areas in the room.

2. Carpets are cut from mother rolls that are usually 4m wide and you can chose the length. Vinyls are 2m, 3m or 4m wide.

Below is an example:

measuring example
Example

The room on the left features a bay window, making the room slightly odd in shape - this usually doesn't affect how you measure the room, as you measure the longest and widest bits (3.8m and 4.4m).

Once you know these measurements, you can then pick a carpet size that will fit. In this example, the 3.8m would become 4 metres as carpets are available in either 4 or 5 metre widths, and this measurement is the closest to one of those sizes. The second size - 4.4m - would become 4.5 metres because we sell carpets by the nearest quarter or a metre. You should round your measurements up to the next quarter metre as the norm. However, if this measurement is to .25, .50 or .75 of a metre, you should round up to the next quarter of a metre to allow for wastage.

In this example, the final carpet size required would be 4m x 4.5m.
Exceptions

If you find that both the length and width are greater than 5 metres, you will need a join. In this case, either call us on 03333 202 404 or email us at sales@flooringsuperstore.com with your sizes and we’ll make sure you get the right size carpet so the pile direction all goes in the same direction, creating a uniform look that disguises the join!

Measuring Stairs & Landings

Stairs
For stairs ordering a 2 metres x 4 metres piece will cover 99% of stair cases, even those with a twist or curve - as the carpet fitter will cut the piece down for the stairs as it's getting fitted.

If you are ordering a striped carpet for stairs it will be best to order 2.5 metres x 4 metres to give a bit extra as you will lose quite a bit of carpet to make sure the pattern flows down.

Landing
For your landing you need to use the above guide for standard rooms but add on enough to cover the first step at the top of the stairs.

SEND US YOUR MEASUREMENTS

If you have measured your room and are unsure about what size flooring you need, you can send your measurements to us and we will let you know what you require!

Whether you have a drawing of your room or not, simply let us know the longest and widest parts of your room(s) below, then our team will work out the sizes required and get back in touch quickly to let you know the sizes that you have to order, as well as offer any other advice and answer any questions you may have about our products or service!

WE CAN FIND YOU A FITTER!

Alternatively, if you would like assistance in measuring your room, get in touch on 03333 202 404 and our team will find a fitter local to you that can come out and measure for you.

Fitting Guide

Our Prices are usually at least half the price of high street stores because we keep our costs low and can genuinely pass on real savings to you.

Another part of this is cost saving process is fitting, often when buying from a store they will arrange a fitter for you but it will usually be at an extra cost. At Flooring Superstore we only supply but we can provide you with contact details for fitters in your area. You will just need to call them to arrange the fitting and this is often cheaper than letting the store do it for you.

Still unsure? Use the NICF recommended professionals and they offer an independent inspection service for fitter member installation complaints if you are satisfied.

Arranging a Fitter: The National Institute of Carpet & Floorlayers is an easy place to find an approved fitter local to you. http://www.nicfltd.org.uk

What flooring would you like to fit?
Welcome to our handy guide for fitting your wood floor.

Please take note that this guide is written to the best of our knowledge and is intended as a guide only. It is not aimed to replace a qualified fitter. We are not responsible for any reliance on the following advice and do not accept liability for any product issues due to the incorrect fitting of any floor. We do advise customers to hire a qualified fitter. No complaints regarding the appearance of the product will be accepted by the company once the wood has been installed. It is the responsibility of the owner/installer, whether professional or not to determine that the internal conditions are suitable for the installation of their flooring and that it is fitted correctly.

For more detailed technical information, refer to British Standards Wood Installation Guide BS 8201-1987. The Subfloor must conform to BS8204: Part 1 1987

This guide has been created in a chronological order of laying your wood floor however, we do strongly advise you to read the full guide before laying your floor as there may be something further on that will help you with laying your floor.

FITTING: WOOD FLOORING
BEFORE YOU LAY YOUR FLOOR
Where can I fit wood flooring?

Your wood floor can be laid in most internal rooms except those which are prone excessive damp and wet areas e.g. bathrooms. In areas such as a conservatory or kitchen we advise you to use engineered wood only as long as the room shares the same conditions found in the house.

What tools and materials will I need to lay my wood flooring?

Basics:
Tape measure; Moisture meter (wood, concrete or both); Chalk line & Chalk; Hammer; Electric Power Saw; Carbide tipped saw blade for fine cuts; NIOSH-designated dust mask; Hand saw or jamb saw; Eye protection; Straight edge or spacers; Pry bar; Mallet; Broom; Colour matched wood putty; Tapping block; Pull bar

Additional Supplies, Glue Down Method:
Flooring adhesive; Trowels; Adhesive remover for selected adhesive; Clean rags; Weight roller; Tape; DPM in liquid format (if concrete); Matching finishing touches e.g. Scotia

Additional Supplies, Floating Floor Method:
Flooring Adhesive; Adhesive remover for selected adhesive; Clean rags; Underlay (with in-built DPM if laying over concrete); Matching finishing touches e.g. Scotia

Additional Supplies, Secret Nailing:
Porta-nailer (or alternative nail gun); Lost head nails (32mm if over wooden subfloor, 40mm- 50mm if over joists); Mallet; Matching Finishing Touches e.g. Scotia

This list is a basic list of materials and tools, which you may need. You may need additional supplies to complete your wood flooring.

Delivery and storage of your wood

Before the delivery of your wood flooring:

  • All work involving water, e.g. laying concrete, dry wall and plasterwork must be completed and dried well in advance. A concrete slab must be cured for at least 60 days
  • Conventional heating systems should have been running for a minimum of two weeks
  • Underfloor heating should have been running for a minimum of three weeks
Reason: Due to the natural nature of wood, it will react to any moisture around it and which comes into contact with it and as a result, it will expand and contract. This naturally occurs throughout the year due to the different weather conditions each season and may cause slight gaps between the boards. However, If the humidity fluctuation is excessive, the boards may distort or lift. All possibilities of damp e.g. plumbing etc. should also be checked and repaired if leaking to stop this from occurring.

Acclimatising your wood

Once your flooring has arrived, it is important to open up your boxes of wood in the area they will be fitted or a room with a similar environment for at least 72 hours to let the wood acclimatize to the room.

Your room temperature should consistently be between 15ºc and 25ºc with a relative humidity between 45% and 65%.

To help acclimatise the wood, we advise you to stack the wood in a lattice shape separated by blocks to allow the air to circulate around it and to let it adapt to the room’s environment. Avoid placing the wood near a radiator or heat source.

Do not:
- Store flooring in uncontrolled environmental conditions e.g. garages, exterior patios or sheds.

Subfloor conditions

The subfloor is the floor/base you are laying your wood flooring over.

Note: You should only install wood flooring over moisture sealing floors e.g. hardwood, concrete or ceramic tile.

Before laying your wood floor your subfloor must be:

  • Level.
    • If your concrete flooring isn’t level, you will need to use a flexible levelling compound before laying the Damp Proof Membrane (DPM). This will then need to be thoroughly dried before you lay your floor
  • Stable
  • Clean; with no presence of debris, protrusion of nails or other objects
  • A suitable environment for wood
    • We recommend you assess the suitability of the environment using high quality testing equipment. We advise against using existing or previously laid floors as a guide for the environments suitability for wood flooring. Failing to carry out the correct checks and taking precautionary action leads to a huge amount of wood flooring issues
We advise you to sweep the subfloor before the installation.

Preparing your subfloor

Preparing and checking your subfloor is integral to the installation of wood flooring in order to avoid any possible problems occurring after completion.
Concrete Subfloor
If you are laying your wood floor over a concrete subfloor the concrete must:

  • Be free from any moisture related conditions
  • Have a moisture level of 12% or below
  • Have a DPM (Damp-Proof Membrane) used on top of the concrete to act as a moisture barrier - this will prevent moisture from the subfloor being soaked up by your wood floor
    • If there is a DPM already in place check to see there is no damage. If there is, you will need to lay a new DPM.
    • If you are using the glue-down method for solid or engineered wood, you will need to use DPM in a liquid form.
    • If you are laying engineered wood as a floating floor, you will need to use an underlay with an inbuilt DPM barrier. You will need to ensure that the edges of each piece of underlay are joined and taped together to avoid any gaps.
Hardwood Subfloor
If you are laying your wood floor over a hardwood subfloor the hardwood must:

  • Be free from any moisture related conditions with no moisture build up beneath and between the boards
  • Have a moisture level of 12% or below
  • Have no loose boards or nails protruding out
If you are secret nailing your wood floor we do advise you to lay underlay between the hardwood subfloor and your wood floor.

Just before laying your wood floor over a wooden subfloor a final moisture check should be carried out. The wood you are laying must be within +/- 2% of the surface onto which it is to be fitted.

Suspended ground floors must have sufficient cross ventilation to prevent condensation occurring on the underside of the flooring. It is advisable to lay a suitable membrane over the joists to help protect the undersides of the new boards from moisture.

What method of installation is suitable for my wood flooring and subfloor?

IMPORTANT: It is very important to understand what methods of laying a wood flooring are suitable for your sub floor and the type of wood you are installing. The flow chart below lists the available options for a range of situations. If yours is not listed, or if you have any questions, please contact our sales team on ** who will be more than happy to help you.

WE ADVISE YOU AGAINST LAYING YOUR WOOD FLOOR IN ANY OF THE WAYS NOT LISTED FOR YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES BELOW. Carpet

What do I need to think about before laying my floor?

Before laying your floor there are a few things to think about.

  • What direction are you going to lay the boards? We recommend that the boards should be laid lengthways towards the main incoming light source and, where possible down the length of the room. If laying over a hardwood subfloor we advise the floor to be laid in the opposite direction (90 degrees) to the sub floorboards.
  • Have you done a thorough check to ensure the correct finish and quantity has been received?
  • Is the wood acclimatised to the environment?
    • Will my wood floor have significant variation e.g. board length, colour or natural features? – the selection of boards has a significant effect on the finished look of the room.
    • We advise you to dry lay the floor prior to installation. This will help you to distribute the variation evenly and stagger the joints to achieve a natural looking floor with good colour and shade mixture. Alternatively, stack your boards into joint length and colours to help choose which boards to lay in what order
    • Any boards that are prominently different can be used as cuts or installed in less obvious areas
  • Will you need to shorten the height of plinths, doors etc. to allow the wooden boards to fit underneath? If so, we recommend that the plinths and doors are removed before laying your floor.
  • Are you installing new skirting boards? If so, install them after to cover the required gaps round the edge of your wood floor instead of using edging.
Caution:

  • Power tools can be dangerous. Operate in strict accordance to manufacturer’s operating instructions and safety precautions
  • Unsafe and improper use can cause serious injuries
  • Avoid inhalation and exposure to wood dust by mechanical means and by wearing personal protective equipment
  • Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) which include NIOSH or OSHA approved dust masks, safety goggles and work gloves
  • Not following the adhesive manufacturer’s recommendations can lead to installation failure or product damage and will void your warranty
It is extremely important to take precautionary steps NOT to leave finger prints or footprints marks on the face of the board.

Laying underlay

If you are using underlay, it is important to choose the correct underlay to suit the type of wood you have bought (solid or engineered) and the sub-floor you are laying it over. Please refer to section: What method of installation is suitable for my wood flooring and subfloor?

On our website our underlays are clearly labelled as to whether they are suitable for your floor. E.g. Wood to Wood Underlay would be used for your wooden floor if it was going over a wooden subfloor. DO NOT use carpet underlay for laying wood as it is unsuitable for wood flooring.

If you are laying engineered wood over underfloor heating, make sure the underlay is suitable for this use.

Before laying your underlay, remember to sweep or vacuum to ensure the sub-floor is free from debris and remove any protruding nails.

TIP: We advise you to lay your underlay in the opposite direction (90 Degrees) to the direction you are laying your wood floor.

  1. Measure out how much underlay you need and select an underlay suitable for your flooring and sub-floor
  2. Lay your underlay over the entire flooring area placing the lengths side by side with no gaps in-between – this is particularly important for underlay with an in-built DPM
  3. Trim the underlay to fit with either scissors or a knife
  4. Leave a 5-10mm gap around pipes
  5. Tape the joints securely, making sure the joins don’t overlap

LAYING THE WOOD FLOOR
Important information

Make sure your work area is well lit. Good visibility will help you to ensure the colour is consistent and that visually defective planks are detected and removed.

We recommend leaving a 15mm expansion gap around the entire perimeter of the floor (including doorways and fireplaces) and all vertical obstructions to allow for the natural expansion and contraction movement of the wood due to temperature and environmental changes.

If possible, we advise you to fit skirting boards after you have installed your wood as they can conceal the expansion gap around the perimeters. If not, you can conceal the gap with beading or scotia.

Remember: If a product provides instructions, recommendations or requirements, it is important to read these guidelines and take them on board.

Useful information: The tongue is the extension coming out of the side of the plank. The groove is where the tongue inserts into.

GLUE DOWN METHOD

Please refer to the wood laying method flow chart to check whether this is a suitable method to lay your wood for your situation.

This method of laying involves gluing your wooden floor to your subfloor and gluing in-between each of the planks tongue and grooves. If you are going to glue your floor down to a concrete floor you will need to lay down a liquid form of DPM (Damp Proof Membrane) and let it fully dry before you start laying your wooden floor. If you are going to glue your floor down to a wooden subfloor you will need to use wood-to-wood glue.

We stock the highest quality of adhesives. We recommend that one of our hand selected adhesives formulated for hardwood is used for the installation of your wood floor. Always refer to the specific instructions on the flooring adhesive label and adjust our instructions according to the manufacturers.

Words you may come across:
  • Dry-Lay: Glue has to set before laying the floor planks on it.
  • Wet-Lay: (this is the method we have explained below): The glue does not need to set before laying the floor planks on it.


TIP: Continuously check the transfer of adhesive THROUGHOUT the installation process. If the adhesive no longer transfers to the back of the flooring material, it must be removed and a new adhesive should be applied.

1. Mark off (with glue) the width of approximately two planks from the starting line out in the direction of the centre of the room and spread the glue across this area of the sub-floor. Tip: work your way out of a room. Make sure you only spread enough glue to install what can be set within 45 minutes (or the length of time the glue manufacturers recommend. (15 Minutes of open time, 30 minutes for actual installation – this usually covers around two rows width). Repeat this process with the next two rows, etc. until you have completed your room.

2. For your first row, begin with your starter plank. Lay it down in the corner, leaving a l5mm expansion gap around the the wall perimeters (Use spacers or boards to maintain this gap during installation) and with the groove facing towards the wall. Continue for the rest of the row, applying glue to the top grooves before laying the wood down at a 30° angle. Ensure that the plank is secure by exerting pressure in the direction of the tongue whilst pressing the plank down to lock the edge joints and to attach to the adhesive on the sub-floor. If there is a gap along these joints, use a tapping block and a plastic mallet. Use caution to hinder any impact damage. The last plank on this row may have to be cut to size.

3. Next, install the second row, make sure there is a random staggering at the end of the joints of at least 15cm. If the plank is longer or shorter than the first you can place it next to the first without the need for cutting the plank (be attentive to staggering the ends of the boards correctly in adjacent rows to avoid clustering end joints). You could use the offcut from the previous row to start off your next row. This will help to avoid wastage.

4. To install the second row, apply glue to the planks groove, then hold the plank with the groove facing the previous row and keep it at a 30° angle when inserting the groove around the tongue of the first row. Ensure that the plank is secure by exerting pressure in the direction of the tongue whilst pressing the plank down to lock the edge joints. If there is a gap along these joints, use a tapping block and a plastic mallet. Use caution to hinder any impact damage. Remember to glue the boards together at the top end of the planks as well as at the sides.

REMEMBER: Keep checking to see if the glue on the joints and sub-floor has set. If it has and will not transfer to the back of the plank, scrape off the adhesive and apply a fresh layer.

TIP: Any glue that comes in contact with the face of the board should be removed immediately (glue spots can cause damage to the appearance of wood floors especially when dried) using adhesive remover formulated for the glue being used. Follow the adhesive manufacturer’s instruction on adhesive removal. Use clean towels, changing frequently to prevent haze and adhesive residue. If the spot removal damages the appearance of the boards, replace the board.

5. Continue to install the remaining rows in the same format, only laying enough adhesive for two rows (or whatever number of rows you have chosen) at a time, ensuring there is random staggering at the end joints and throughout the floor and always keeping the expansion gap of 15mm around the perimeter of the room. Make sure there is 100% contact between the wood floor and the adhesive you have laid

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TIP: You could use the offcut from the previous row to start off your next row. This will help to avoid wastage. However, be careful to stagger your joints. This may not work on every floor. You will not be able to do this with the offcut of your first row as this will have its tongue removed.

6. For the last row of boards it is likely that you will need to cut them to fit the gap. Remember to leave the 15mm expansion gap between the last row and the wall.
To do this, measure the distance between the floor face edge (exclude the tongue) to the wall. Subtract 15mm from this measurement for the expansion gap. Draw a line on the wood plank. Cut through the line. Discard the excess piece and proceed with installation.

IMPORTANT: The last row of boards need to be at least 50mm wide, you may need to cut the first row of boards to ensure you achieve this.

7. To avoid any gaps between the joints on your last row use a pull bar to draw the last row to fit tightly to the previous row.

8. cover the expansion gaps with either your skirting or beading.

SECRET NAILING

Please refer to the wood laying method flow chart to check whether this is a suitable method to lay your wood for your situation.

Secret nailing is the installation method where serrated nails are driven on a 45° angle through the tongue of wood floor into the wooden subfloor using a secret nail gun, then simply hammered in for extra security.

TIP: Ensure you use suitable flooring nails throughout the laying process. You will need to use 32mm* lost head nails or the nails provided with your Porta-Nailer (nail gun), (We don’t advise you to use nails any bigger than this as they could go through the floorboards and hit pipes etc.) if using on hardwood /floorboard subfloor. For structured floors, the nails will need to be 40mm to 50mm lost head nails.

If you are going to secret nail your wood floor to your wooden subfloor you will need to firstly lay an underlay over your subfloor (after ensuring the subfloor is in a suitable condition) to act as a moisture and noise barrier.

Please note that 18mm or thicker plywood or solid wood subfloors will hold the flooring nails better than MDF or chipboard.

1. When possible, begin the installation from the longest and straightest wall or feature wall e.g. fireplace or door. However, we do strongly recommend that you lay your wood floor at 90° perpendicular to your floorboards.

TIP: Work your way out of a room.

REMEMBER: Leave an expansion gap around all perimeters of 15mm. Use spacers or boards to maintain this gap during installation.

2. You will then need to install the first row of starter planks, starting the corner with the groove of the wood facing the wall and leaving a 15mm expansion gap around the perimeter of the wall. The last plank on this row may have to be cut to size.

3. For the first two rows of your floor they will need to be face-fixed (Vertically). I.e. Drill a fine hole into the top of the wood floor and then nail it through into the sub floor. Sink the nail head with a punch then fill the whole.

TIP: Take care not to allow the nails to penetrate further than the sub floor and to not damage any pipes or electrical cables beneath.

4. Starting with the tongue of the second row you will need to secret nail the floor down. This involves driving a serrated nail at a 45° angle through the tongue of the wood plank using a secret nail gun then simply hammering it in for extra security (be careful not to hit too hard as to not break the boards. This ensures that the boards are secured tight against each other, will remain in place and will not show any nails in the finished look.

Generally, you will need to secret nail the tongue of the wood at 150mm – 200mm intervals – If the board is wide, we recommend narrower spacing.

The boards should fit snugly together at each join. If they don’t there could be debris in the groove or the tongue may be damaged. Clear this before you nail the board down.

TIP: You could use the offcut from the previous row to start off your next row this will help to avoid wastage. However, be careful to stagger your joints. This may not work on every floor.

5. Keep nailing the boards down until you have completed the room. For your last row of boards, it is likely that you will need to cut the width of the board down to ensure you are left with the 15mm expansion gap between the row and the wall.

To do this, measure the distance between the floor face edge (exclude the tongue) to the wall. Subtract 15mm from this measurement for the expansion gap. Draw a line on the wood plank. Cut through the line. Discard the excess piece and proceed with installation.

IMPORTANT: The last row of boards need to be at least 50mm wide, you may need to cut the first row of boards to ensure you achieve this.

REMEMBER: Take care to make sure there is a random staggering at the end of the joints of at least 15cm. If the plank is longer than the first you can place it next to the first without the need for cutting the plank (be attentive to staggering the ends of the boards correctly in adjacent rows to avoid clustering end joints).

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We recommend the use of Porta-Nailer when secret nailing your floor. They are highly recognised throughout the industry, reliable and easy to use.

FLOATING A LAMINATE OR ENGINEERED WOOD FLOOR

Please refer to the wood laying method flow chart to check whether this is a suitable method to lay your wood for your situation.

We highly recommend that before you lay the wood, an underlay is laid (if you are laying over concrete, the underlay will need to have an in-built DAMP-PROOF MEMBRANE or alternatively you can use a liquid form of DPM over the concrete with underlay over the top) over the wooden or concrete subfloor to provide cushioning and moisture resistance between the floor and sub floor.

This method can be used for engineered wood or laminate only. We highly recommend that before you lay the wood floor, an underlay is laid over the subfloor to provide cushioning and moisture resistance between the floor and subfloor.

If you are laying the engineered over concrete, the underlay will need to have an in-built Damp-Proof Membrane or alternatively you can use a liquid form of DPM over the concrete with underlay over the top.

We stock the highest quality adhesives for fitting your wood floor. We advise that a non-water based premium adhesive formulated for hardwood is used for the installation of your wood floor. Always refer to the specific instructions on the flooring adhesive label and adjust our instructions according to the manufacturers.

TIP: Continuously check the transfer of adhesive throughout the installation process. If the adhesive no longer transfers to the tongue or groove of the plank it must be removed and a new adhesive applied. Normally a glue will set within 45 minutes which includes 15 minutes of open time and 30 minutes for installation (please check your glue packaging for details as this may change between brands and glue types).

1. Firstly, lay your starter plank in the corner of the room you are starting from (tip: work your way out of a room) with the groove of the wood facing the wall and leaving a 15mm expansion gap around the perimeter of the room.

TIP: We do recommend that you lay your wood floor at 90°, perpendicular to your floorboards.

Remember: Leave an expansion gap around all perimeters of 15mm. Use spacers or boards to maintain this gap during installation.

2. Then apply glue to the groove of the second plank and lay it down at a 30° angle. Ensure that the plank is secure by exerting pressure in the direction of the tongue whilst pressing the plank down to lock the edge joints. If there is a gap along these joints, use a tapping block and a plastic mallet. Use caution to hinder any impact damage. Continue for the rest of the row. The last plank on this row may have to be cut to size.

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3. Next, install the second row, make sure there is a random staggering at the end of the joints of at least 15cm. If the plank is longer than the first you can place it next to the first without the need for cutting the plank. Be attentive to staggering the ends of the boards correctly in adjacent rows to avoid clustering end joints. You could use the offcut from the previous row to start off your next row this will help to avoid wastage.

4. To install the second row, apply glue to the planks groove, then hold the plank with the groove facing the previous row and keep it at a 30° angle when inserting the groove around the tongue of the first row. Ensure that the plank is secure by exerting pressure in the direction of the tongue whilst pressing the plank down to lock the edge joints. If there is a gap along these joints, use a tapping block and a plastic mallet. Use caution to hinder any impact damage. Remember to glue the boards together at the top end of the planks as well as at the sides.

Remember: Keep checking to see if the glue on the joints has set. If it has and will not transfer to the tongue of the plank, scrape off the adhesive and apply a fresh layer.

TIP: Any glue that comes in contact with the face of the board should be removed immediately (glue spots can cause damage to the appearance of wood floors especially when dried) using adhesive remover formulated for the glue being used. Follow the adhesive manufacturer’s instruction on adhesive removal. Use clean towels, changing frequently to prevent haze and adhesive residue. If the spot removal damages the appearance of the boards, replace the board.

5. Continue to install the remaining rows, ensuring there is random staggering at the end joints and throughout the floor and always keeping the expansion gap of 15mm round the perimeter of the room.

6. For your last row of boards it is likely that you will need to cut the width of the board down to ensure you are left with the 15mm expansion gap between the row and the wall.

To do this, measure the distance between the floor face edge (exclude the tongue) to the wall. Subtract 15mm from this measurement for the expansion gap. Draw a line on the wood plank. Cut through the line. Discard the excess piece and proceed with installation.

IMPORTANT: The last row of boards need to be at least 50mm wide, you may need to cut the first row of boards to ensure you achieve this.

STRUCTURED JOISTS FITTING

Please refer to the wood laying method flow chart to check whether this is a suitable method to lay your wood for your situation.

When laying wood on a structured floor (joists) you will need to use the secret nailing method.

Only structured boards over 20mm thick can be fixed over sound and secure joists. When laying boards directly onto existing joists the gap between the joists should not exceed 450mm.

Remember: As there is no sub-floor you will need to install the flooring perpendicular (90°) to the joists.

TIP: We strongly advise you to use fixed length boards of 1860mm when laying wood on a structured floor to avoid having unusable sized boards.

Important: There must be a moisture barrier laid below the joists to ensure the wood does not soak up any moisture.

Suspended ground floors must have sufficient cross ventilation to prevent condensation occurring on the underside of the flooring. It is advisable to lay a suitable membrane over the joists to help protect the undersides of the new boards from moisture.

TIP: Work your way out of a room.

TIP: Ensure you use suitable flooring nails throughout the laying process. These will need to be either 40mm or 50mm lost head nails depending on the width of the board.

1. Begin the installation from the longest and straightest wall. Take the starter plank and lay it in the corner, 90° to the joists with the groove facing the wall and leaving a 15mm expansion gap around the perimeter of the room. Make sure that all joins at the top and bottom of each plank are over a joist to ensure they are supported. Then secure it by driving a nail on a 45° angle through the tongue of wood floor into the joists using a secret nail gun. Then simply hammer the nail in for extra security - be careful not to hit the boards too hard as you may cause the board damage. The boards should fit snugly together at each join. If they don’t there could be debris in the groove or the tongue may be damaged. Clear this before you nail the board down.

TIP: Run a bead of glue along each of the joists for extra security and stability before laying the boards over. We would also advise gluing between each of the joints for extra stability.

TIP: When laying each row, be careful to stagger the joints to create a more natural looking finish.

Remember: Leave an expansion gap around all perimeters of 15mm. Use spacers or boards to maintain this gap during installation.

2. Continue laying the rest of the row, securing each board to any joist it covers using the secret nailing method.

3. For the first two rows of your floor they will need to be face-fixed (Vertically). I.e. Drill a fine hole into the wood floor and nail it through into the joists. Sink the nail head with a punch then fill the whole. This helps to secure the first rows.

4. Keep nailing the boards down until you have completed the room remembering to secret nail them at every point they cross a joist. For your last row of boards it is likely that you will need to cut the width of the board down to ensure you are left with the 15mm expansion gap between the row and the wall.

To do this, measure the distance between the floor face edge (exclude the tongue) to the wall. Subtract 15mm from this measurement for the expansion gap. Draw a line on the wood plank. Cut through the line. Discard the excess piece and proceed with installation.

IMPORTANT: The last row of boards need to be at least 50mm wide, you may need to cut the first row of boards to ensure you achieve this.

Remember: Take care to make sure there is a random staggering at the end of the joints of at least 15cm. If the plank is longer than the first you can place it next to the first without the need for cutting the plank (Be attentive to staggering the ends of the boards correctly in adjacent rows to avoid clustering end joints).

Carpet

We recommend the use of a Porta-Nailer and Nails when secret nailing your floor. They are highly recognised throughout the industry, reliable and easy to use.

Sound control underlayment

Check with sound control manufacturer for application guidelines. Generally, the less compressive underlayment is preferred.

Underfloor heating

If you are installing underfloor heating you will need to use Engineered Wood only. You must make your underfloor heating supplier aware that a wood floor will be installed over their system.

The underfloor heating system must be ran as per the manufacturer’s guidelines for at least three weeks prior to the wood installation. The heating should then be turned off and allowed to cool prior to the installation.

Over water systems we would recommend you to use adhesive and a layer of liquid DPM to lay the floor down or with underlay and laid as a floating floor. Over electric mat systems, where the electric mat is not the main source of heating, the engineered boards can be floated.

When the wood flooring installation is complete and dried (if using adhesive), increase the underfloor heating temperature gradually so the wood can adjust to the heat. The operating surface temperature of the new wooden floor must not exceed 27ºc (81ºf). Significant damage may occur to the flooring if this is not adhered to.

Glue down installation may require an additional installation requirement. Contact the glue manufacturer and heater manufacture for specific recommendations and instructions.

Fitting wood flooring around a radiator pipe

To fit your wood flooring around a radiator pipe you will need to follow the below steps (you will need a jigsaw to do this task):

1. Remove your radiator
2. Mark out the width of the radiator pipe on the plank in the location the pipe will come through the board
3. Add 15mm to your pipe width and mark a circle 15mm bigger to allow for expansion
4. Drill a hole in the middle of the marking you have made (wide enough for the jigsaw blade to fit through)
5. Insert the jigsaw into the hole and work your way out to the edge of the pipe + the 15mm marking
6. Slowly work your way round the circle so you will end up with a circle piece of wood cut out of your plank
7. You will then have a hole in your flooring. Lay the plank down in place with the radiator pipe coming through the hole.
8. Fix the board down using the same laying method you have used for the rest of your flooring
9. Apply your radiator ring to hide the expansion gap
a. FC radiator rings are self-adhesive
b. Solid radiator rings use a click system and will need to be glued down to your floor

COMPLETING YOUR WOOD FLOOR
How to finish your wood floor

To finish your floor you will need to take the following actions:

  • Clean the floor – only using a brush, dry mop and specialised wood cleaning products
  • Use matching putty where necessary
  • Install or reinstall scotia, beading and skirting boards to the wall, not the subfloor to avoid restricting the expansion gap
  • Tip: Lay out your finishing touches in advance so you can find the planks whose shade closely matches them
  • Install transition trim pieces e.g. T-profiles, nailing them to the sub floor at doorways etc. This helps protect the edges of the floor and provides a decorative transition from one floor type to another
(If the floor is to be covered, use a breathable material such as cardboard. Do not cover with plastic.)

After the installation is completed, keep the floor free from daily foot traffic for a minimum of 24 hours to allow adhesive to properly cure.

Other key bits of information:

Do:

  • Place protector pads on the base of chair legs or furniture bases resting on the wood floor
  • Ensure that areas underneath rugs and mats stay dry and are cleaned on a regular basis to prevent abrasion
  • Regularly sweep or vacuum to remove any dirt and grit which may abrase the surface finish
  • Use specialist cleaning products which are suitable for the type of finish on your flooring
  • Avoid sharp items coming into contact with your floor
Do Not:
  • Place permanently installed structures such as kitchen counters/cabinets on the installed floor
  • Use wet mops, as excessive moisture will damage your floor
  • Leave grit or dirt on the floor as this will damage and scratch the surface.
  • Use all-purpose cleaning products unless specifically for use on wood floors.

Welcome to our handy guide for fitting your carpet.

Welcome to our handy guide for fitting your Carpet.

Please take note that this guide is written to the best of our knowledge and is intended as a guide only. It is not aimed to replace a qualified fitter. We are not responsible for any reliance on the following advice and do not accept liability for any product issues due to the incorrect fitting of any floor. We do advise customers to hire a qualified fitter. No complaints regarding the appearance of the product will be accepted by the company once the carpet has been installed. It is the responsibility of the owner/installer, whether professional or not to determine that the internal conditions are suitable for the installation of their flooring and that it is fitted correctly.

This guide has been created in a chronological order of laying your carpet however, we do strongly advise you to read the full guide before laying your floor as there may be something further on that will help you with laying your floor.

FITTING: CARPETS
BEFORE YOU LAY YOUR CARPET
What tools do I need to fit my carpet?

  • Carpet knife
  • Carpet stretcher/ Knee kicker
  • Bolster/carpet tucker – for stretching and tucking the carpet
  • Staple hammer/ gun – for tacking the underlay into place
  • Strip cutter or heavy snips
  • Knee pads
  • Grippers
  • Carpet
  • Underlay

May need:

  • Carpet steaming iron
  • Seaming tape
Carpet fitting tips!

  • When choosing your carpet, hessian or woven-backed carpets are usually of higher quality than those that are foam-backed
  • Make sure your carpet is stored safely and carefully before you lay it. We advise you to keep it rolled to avoid any problems when you are about to lay and stretch it
  • We advise you to have someone to help you lay and carry your carpet as they can be heavy and hard to move
  • Fitting a carpet can be hard on your knees. We recommend that you use knee pads whilst you are laying your carpet

Preparing my subfloor

The subfloor is the floor/based you are laying your carpet and underlay over.

There are three main steps to preparing your subfloor:

  • It is very important to ensure the surface of your subfloor is stable, smooth, clean and as flat as possible before you start laying your carpet. We strongly advise you to sweep the floor thoroughly to remove any debris/stones and to remove any protruding nails (if a hardwood subfloor) as this could damage your carpet.
  • Remove any doors in the room you are laying your carpet so you don’t need to work around them.

Laying the carpet grippers:

Begin to nail (if hardwood subfloor) or glue (if hard subfloor e.g. concrete or tile) your carpet grippers (long, thin pieces of wood with small sharp pins to hold the carpet in place) around the edge of the room ensuring that a gap of 1.5 times the thickness of the carpet between the wall and the gripper.

  • DO NOT lay a gripper in front of your doorway or thresholds – you will need to use a doorbar here (over the top of your carpet) instead
  • When laying the gripper ensure the angled edge facing the wall
  • You may need to cut the grippers to size with a strip cutter or heavy snips
  • If you are nailing the grippers down, CHECK for any hidden wire or pipes with a pipe and cable detector and mark their positions. If there are any in the way or you are trying to fit a gripper in an awkward place you will need to use adhesive instead

Grippers
Laying the underlay:

We strongly advise you to lay new underlay with your new carpet. Underlay has numerous benefits:

  • Extends the life of the carpet
  • Protects the carpet
  • Adds extra comfort
  • Improves noise and heat insulation
  • Helps to maintain the carpets warranty
If you don’t want to use underlay we do advise you to buy a felt-backed carpet.

You can use the underlay which is already laid, however like carpets, over time underlay can wear and decrease in effectiveness and therefore to receive the optimum benefits of underlay we advise you to purchase a new piece.

When laying your underlay, you will need to:
  • lay it so it overlaps the carpet gripper
  • lay the underlay in strips against/alongside each other tightly (do not overlap them as this will cause lumps)
  • Staple, glue (with adhesive) or lay the underlay down along the inside edge of the carpet gripper (once it has been cut)
  • Trim the excess underlay along the inside of the gripper using a sharp knife so that it fits neatly within and flush against all of the carpet grippers
  • Use underlay tape to seal the seams between each strip of underlay to prevent any lines showing through your new carpet and to stop the underlay from moving when you are laying out and stretching the carpet

Underlay Fitting Underlay Fitting Underlay Fitting
LAYING YOUR CARPET
How to lay the carpet

1. Lay your cut of carpet in your room so that there is an overlap at each side of the wall of at least 10cm. Along each edge smooth the carpet down and push it in place along the floor and against the wall so that it is as flat as possible against the ground with no creases
Carpet Fitting
2. Where the carpet meets the wall use a bolster or carpet tucker to create a clear fold/crease along the skirting board
Carpet Fitting
3. Trim the carpet (which should be as flat to the ground as possible) using a carpet knife to size plus 50mm to 75mm extra so that the carpet still overlaps that skirting board slightly
  • If the overlap is too big you may want to cut a bit of the overlap off first before you cut it to size (plus 50mm to 75mm extra on) so you can be more accurate. If you are going to do this, we recommend that the overlap is cut to about 10cm up each wall
Carpet Fitting
4. To trim the excess in the corner, cut a small vertical line so the carpet lays flush to the gripper and the ground

Important: Be careful not to mark the skirting board when you are cutting your carpet.
Carpet Fitting
5. Using a knee kicker/ carpet stretcher:
  • Place the end of the carpet stretcher about 10cm -20cm away from one of the walls (you should be facing the wall)
  • Kick your knee forcefully into the padded end of the knee kicker. This will stretch the carpet over the carpet gripper
  • The tacks should grab hold if your carpet and keep it firmly in place
  • Do this every 600 - 900mm along the wall then continue around the room
6. If the overlap has increased in size, using a carpet tucker/bolster create a new crease against the skirting to make a fold line and again trim the overlap so that there is between 50mm and 75mm extra
7. Then using a bolster/carpet tucker push the edge of the excess carpet (50mm to 75mm) behind the carpet gripper
8. Continue around the room, until all the carpet is tucked neatly behind the gripper and is as flat as possible. If there is a lump at the edges where the edge hasn’t been able to tucked away properly you may have left too much excess around the edge of the carpet
Carpet Fitting
9. For the doorway, trim the carpet so that the edge will be underneath the closed door and so it is in line with the edge of the flooring of the next room. You will need to install a door bar to hide the edge and keep the carpet in place and safe. Position the door bar centrally under your door so it can be seen either side when the door is closed. Measure and cut it to the right length using a hacksaw
  • Before securing the doorbar in place, check for any hidden pipes and cables under your floor. For concrete you will need to drill some holes with a power drill and masonry bit then fill the with wall plugs. For wooden floors, make pilot holes with a bradawl or drill and screw the bar to the floor
TIP: If you are trying to lay a carpet around a difficult shape e.g. a doorframe, make multiple cuts down the overlap and then trim the carpet with the carpet knife.

TIP: To fit a carpet around a pipe, make a straight cut from the edge of the carpet to the centre of the pipe then cut round the pipe until the carpet lies flat.

Joining the seams of two carpet pieces
If your room is more than 5m wide you may need to join two or more pieces of carpet together. If this is the case, it is very important that the pile of each carpet piece is running in the same direction to avoid the join being too obvious.

Tip: If you can, try to choose an area for the join where the seams won’t be in a noticeable position or in high traffic areas e.g. under the couch.
Joining Carpet
1. Lay your first piece of carpet in the same format as instructed in Laying your carpet but don’t bolster the carpet down where the join is going to be

PLEASE NOTE: If you have chosen a location for where you want your join to be and it is smaller than the size of your carpet, cut your first piece of carpet in that location (leaving at least 10cm extra on the width). Before you do this, ensure that your second piece of carpet is wide enough to meet this join and overlap it by 10cm.

IMPORTANT: Even though there are two pieces of carpet being laid only lay the carpet grippers around the circumference of the room.
Joining Carpet
2. lay your second piece of carpet using the Laying your carpet instructions. It is important that this piece has an overlap going up each wall of at least 10cm and overlaps the first piece by at least 10cm
Joining Carpet
3. Using a carpet knife, cut through both pieces of carpet where the join should be ensuring the edges match exactly so that there is no gap
Joining Carpet
4. a piece of seaming tape (sticky side up) on the floor underneath where the join will be
Joining Carpet
5. Use a carpet seaming Iron along the seaming tape (not the carpet) to activate the adhesive then lay the carpet down on top of the tape with the edges tightly together

6. Seal the seam with a roller

7. Finish by bolstering the rest of the carpet to conceal the corners
Tip: If you are buying two pieces of carpet to go in one room, we strongly advise you to order both pieces in the same width to avoid colour variation between the pieces e.g. underneath a couch or a table.
Fitting carpet and underlay on a staircase
STAIR TERMINOLOGY

Firstly, remove any old carpet and underlay from your stairs as well as the tacks, nails and staples which have previously been used then give the stairs a good clean.
Fitting Stair Carpet
Installing the grippers:
  • Fit a gripper (with the angled edge of the gripper is facing away from you) at the back of the tread of each stair ensuring there is a gap of 1.5 times the thickness of the carpet between the back of the stair tread and the gripper
  • Fit another gripper on the bottom of the rise of each stair (with the angled edge of the gripper is facing down towards the treads gripper) ensuring there is a gap of 1.5 times the thickness of the carpet between the bottom of the rise and the gripper
  • Don’t put a gripper at the bottom of your stairs, only on the bottom of the rise to hold the last piece of carpet
Fitting Stair Carpet
Laying the underlay:
  • You will need to cut your underlay off in strips about 6mm narrower than your stairs. (You will be installing the underlay in little segments, one for each step)
  • Start by laying your underlay from the top stair
  • Fit and staple the underlay to the stair tread of the top stair, take it over the nose and staple it just underneath the nose, keeping the underlay taut at all times
  • On the rest of your stairs, fit and staple your underlay against the front of the carpet gripper at the back of each stair tread, take it over the nose and staple it just underneath the nose, keeping the underlay taut. Remove the excess underlay underneath the staples
  • Continue until you have reached the bottom of your stairs
Fitting Stair Carpet
Fitting the carpet:

For a standard sized straight staircase with a plain carpet we advise our customers to buy a 4m x 2m carpet so you can divide it into two cuts of 4m x 1m carpet so you would fit the carpet in two pieces. However, please measure your staircase to ensure this carpet size would cater for your stairs. For help/advice, please contact our sales team on 03333 20 24 02.

Whatever sized carpet you buy, we would advise you to cut it into sections which will be about 10cm – 15cm wider than your stairs and long enough to reach the bottom of the stairs rise. If you are covering a curved staircase we would advise you to lay the carpet step by step due to width and angle changes. You can choose to cover a step at a time or cover them all in one go, but the latter will be more difficult (plus you will need to purchase a bigger piece of carpet and there will be more wastage).

For a standard staircase with a striped carpet we would advise you to order a longer carpet to cater for the pattern repeat.

Tip: If you are laying the carpet on your landing and using the same carpet for your stairs, leave enough extra carpet on the stairs side so you can cut it to go down the top step. This way you won’t see the join.
Fitting Stair Carpet
1. Check that the width and depth of your stairs stays the same on each step before cutting the carpet to size

2. Cut the width of your carpets to the width of the stairs. If the stair widths fluctuate you may need to cut the carpet to the widest width and trim to size once you have lain it.
Fitting Stair Carpet
3. Usually, when you lay your landing carpet, you will leave an excess piece that will go over the nose of the top step and down to the tread, If not, you will need to staple your first piece of the carpet at the top of the stairs rise, making sure there is a neat join between the stair carpet and the landing carpet. If your landing and stair carpets are different, you may prefer to take the stair carpet over the top step and finish with a joining strip between both carpets.
  • Then, keeping the carpet taut, take the carpet over the nose of the stairs
  • Staple it underneath the nose to make sure it fits snuggly against the step
  • Take it down the rise until you reach the back of the tread
  • Secure the carpet in place over the carpet gripper and bolster it so it folds in towards the crease of the stairs in between both grippers then staple it in on the riser
  • Use a knee kicker facing the rise of the stair to stretch the carpet into the crease of the stair. Start from the middle and work from side to side
  • Continue with the remaining of the piece finishing at the base of a stairs rise so you hide the join
4. you have used your landing carpet to go over the top step and down to the base of the rise:
  • Take your first piece of stair carpet pile facing downwards and tack it to the back of the tread (so the carpets meet) of the next step down
  • Keep the carpet taut so it goes over the gripper and around the nose
  • Staple the carpet underneath the nose to make sure it fits snuggly against the step
  • Take it down the rise until you reach the back of the tread
  • Secure the carpet in place over the carpet gripper and bolster it so it folds in towards the crease of the stairs in between both grippers then staple it in on the riser
  • Use a knee kicker on the tread of the stair you have just covered and facing the rise of the stair to stretch the carpet into the crease of the stair. Start from the middle and work from side to side
  • Continue taking the rest of the carpet piece down until it gets to the base of the last rise it can cover, remembering to staple it at the base of the rise, using the bolster and trimming off any excess
  • Then take your second piece and continue in the same process until you have completed your stairs
Fitting Stair Carpet
TIP: When stapling your carpet try and get in between the fibres of the carpet to avoid catching one under the staple and creating a dimple in the carpet. If you do manage to catch one, gently pull it out using a flat-head screwdriver so you don’t pull the fibre out of the backing.

PLEASE NOTE: When you are stapling, ensure that the staples are distributed evenly. The number of staples you need to use depends on the carpet you are installing. Thicker carpets such as a saxony may require thicker staples.

REMEMBER: When laying your carpet on the stairs, keep it as taut as possible at all times.
Fitting Stair Carpet